Discover Sudan!

Where we go

The tours of Discover Sudan! take you to the north of the country i.e. roughly the area between Khartoum and the Egyptian border. Our itineraries follow the lifeline of the Nile, but we also venture into the vast savannah and desert areas east and west of it.

Our itineraries include all major archaeological sites in Sudan, but we also head for many rarely visited places.

Moreover, we visit several sights in eastern Sudan, primarily in combination with diving add-ons. 

 

Amara West

Amara West is a town site about 100 kilometres south of the Second Cataract. It was founded under Pharaoh Seti I and served as the administrative centre of the southern part of the Nubian province in the later New Kingdom. Read more ...

Bayuda dessert

The Bayuda Desert is the area south of the Great Bend of the Nile. Archaeological evidence shows that the Bayuda has seen human occupation from the Old Stone Age through almost all periods of history. Read more ...

Dangeil

Dangeil is situated just upstream of the Fifth Cataract, 320 kilometres north of Khartoum. It is the site of an urban settlement of the Meroitic period. Its most important monument is a temple of Amun built in the 1st century AD. Read more ...

Erkowit

Erkowit is a kind of Sudanese Davos. It is situated 40 kilometres from the shores of the Red Sea in the Red Sea Mountains at a breath-taking altitude of 1100 metres. Due to this location, it boasts a unique flora and fauna. Read more ...

Ghazali

The monastery of Ghazali is situated in the lower part of the Wadi Abu Dom, opposite Jebel Barkal. It dates from the 10th century AD, when Christianity was at its height, and is a good example of Nubian monasticism. Read more ...

Hajar al-Merwa

Hajar al-Merwa is a huge quartzite outcrop just above the Great Nile Bend. It carries the famous boundary inscriptions of Thutmose I and Thutmose III which mark the southernmost extension of Pharaonic Egypt. Read more ...

Jebel Barkal

The UNESCO World Heritage site of Jebel Barkal is situated some 350 km north of Khartoum. It features some of the most important archaeological monuments of Sudan and is a key site of the Napatan period. Read more ...

Jebel Dosha

Jebel Dosha is a picturesque sandstone promontory right beside the Nile, between Soleb and Sedeinga. It features a rock-cut chapel of Pharaoh Thutmose III and several rock inscriptions of New Kingdom date. Read more ...

Kawa

Kawa is situated between the Third and the Fourth Cataracts of the Nile, opposite from Dongola. Its main monument is a temple of Amun, commissioned by the Napatan king Taharqo. Read more ...

Kerma

Kerma, at the southern end of the Third Cataract, was the centre of the major Bronze Age culture in the Middle Nile valley. The site comprises an urban agglomeration, a vast cemetery and a Pharaonic town. Read more ...

Khartoum

Strategically located at the confluence of the Blue and the White Nile, Khartoum was founded as an Egyptian military outpost in 1821. It became the capital of Turkish-Egyptian Sudan in 1834. Read more ...

Kurru

Kurru is the ancestral cemetery of the Kushite rulers who also came to rule over Egypt as the 25th Dynasty. It is located 15 kilometres downstream of Jebel Barkal, on the northern bank of the Nile. Read more ...

Masida

Masida is situated above the Third Cataract in an area enclosed by a sharp eastward turn in the river, eight kilometres away from the Nile. The site features a small medieval church built high up in the rocks. Read more ...

Meroe

The UNESCO World Heritage site of Meroe is situated about 200 kilometres northeast of Khartoum. It became the capital of the Kushite Kingdom at the onset of the Meroitic period, about 300 BC. Read more ... 

Musawwarat es-Sufra

Musawwarat es-Sufra is situated about 120 kilometres northeast of Khartoum and 25 kilometres east of the Nile. Most of its standing monuments, including the unique Great Enclosure, date from the Meroitic period. Read more ...

Naga

Naga is situated about 110 kilometres northeast of Khartoum and 30 kilometres east of the Nile, on the banks of Wadi Awateib. Naga houses some of best preserved relics of the Meroitic period. Read more ...

Nauri

Nauri is a modern village situated in the downstream section of the Third Cataract. The site is of historical interest mainly because of the so-called Nauri Decree of Seti I. Read more ...

Nubia and the Nubian people

Nubia is a geographical term as well as the designation of a people. Nubians live in the Nile valley in southern Egypt and northern Sudan. Read more ...

Nuri

Nuri is the second cemetery of the Kushite rulers. It is situated 10 kilometres upstream of Jebel Barkal, on the southern bank of the Nile. Nuri was established by Taharqo, the most important king of the 25th Dynasty. Read more ...

Old Dongola

Old Dongola is located at the downstream end of the Great Nile Bend. It was the capital of the medieval Kingdom of Makuria. Its exposed remains include several churches, a monastic complex and part of the royal quarters. Read more ...

Port Sudan

Port Sudan is Sudan's major port on the Red Sea. Its development started in the early 20th century under British rule. The town is still characterised by its colonial beginnings, with many old buildings being preserved. Read more ...

Sabu

Sabu is Sudan's largest rock art site. It is situated at the downstream end of the Third Cataract. Reportedly, Sabu comprises more than 1600 drawings from different periods. Read more ...

Sai Island

Sai Island is situated between the Second and Third Nile Cataracts. It has a very long and rich occupational history, with sites of the Kerma, Pharaonic, medieval and Islamic periods. Read more ...

Sanam

Sanam is a modern village six kilometres downstream of Jebel Barkal. Parts of a Napatan town have been revealed here. Its major monument is a temple of Amun. Read more ... 

Sedeinga

Sedeinga is located 13 kilometres north of Soleb, on the west bank of the Nile. Its main monument is a temple built by Amenhotep III, dedicated to Queen Tiye as a manifestation of the Eye of Ra. Read more ...

Sesebi

Sesebi is a New Kingdom town below the Third Cataract. Much of the extant town, including two temple complexes, derives from the reign of Amenhotep IV, before he changed his name to Akhenaten. Read more ...

Shalfak

Shalfak is an Egyptian fortress on an island in the Second Cataract area. It was built under Senusret III. It is one of a chain of 17 fortresses with which the Middle Kingdom pharaohs secured Egypt's southern frontier. Read more ... 

Soleb

Soleb is situated about 60 kilometres north of the Third Cataract. Its main monument is a large temple erected under Pharaoh Amenhotep III. It was dedicated to Amun-Ra and the deified king. Read more ...

Suakin

Suakin is an ancient port town about 60 kilometres south of Port Sudan. From the 15th to the 19th centuries AD, it was the most important harbour on the African coast of the Red Sea. Read more ...

Tanqasi

Tanqasi is a modern village about 15 kilometres downstream from Jebel Barkal on the southern bank of the Nile. The nearby post-Meroitic cemetery features numerous monumental tumuli. Read more ...

Tombos

Tombos is the name of a series of sites on the east bank of the Nile in the area of the Third Cataract. They include numerous rock inscriptions, a New Kingdom cemetery and a quarry with an unfinished Napatan statue. Read more ...

Uronarti

Uronarti is an Egyptian fortress on an island in the Second Cataract area. It was built under Senusret III. It is one of a chain of 17 fortresses with which the Middle Kingdom pharaohs secured Egypt's southern frontier. Read more ... 

Wad ban Naga

Wad ban Naga is an urban site of the Meroitic period, situated about 120 kilometres northeast of Khartoum. Its main monument is the remains of a royal palace, which was possibly built by Queen Amanishakheto. Read more ...

Zuma

Zuma is a modern village about 20 kilometres downstream from Jebel Barkal on the northern bank of the Nile. The nearby post-Meroitic cemetery contains numerous impressive tumuli. Read more ...